All posts by Emma Hartsock

About Emma Hartsock

Emma Hartsock is an undergraduate student at the University of North Texas, majoring in Sociology with minors in Criminal Justice and Biology. She’s got experience in everything from volunteering as a summer camp counselor and regular babysitting, to just happily hanging out with her younger cousins and brother. She spends her time working hard at personal projects such as her writing, design, and any other various enterprises she has on the burner.

For the love of science

  Making learning fun is a challenge for many people that interact with kids, whether they’re parents or childcare workers. Trying to balance fun with actual educational content can feel nearly impossible. But the science of the world around us can be very interesting and even downright enjoyable and teaching the scientific method doesn’t have […]

Tabletop Roleplaying Games and Kids: Creativity and Problem-Solving

You’ve likely heard of the game Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) and similar games before, at least in passing. You may even be a regular player (and if you are, you might want to just skim this article, there will definitely be some bits that are just explaining what a roleplaying game is, which people with […]

Learning Biology, Exercising Empathy, and Appreciating Nature: Using Bugs to Teach Kids

Bugs. They’re annoying. Gross, perhaps. Maybe for you they’re even scary. But I’m writing this to try and convince you that you should give bugs a chance, particularly when a kid is watching you interact with them. Bugs can be an uncommon way to teach a kid about appreciating nature and biology, and also an […]

Playing Pretend can be a Great Spot for budding Writers to Try New Ideas

Babysitting was the first thing I did as a job when I was a young teen. And like many a young babysitter, the main activity done to keep the kiddos occupied was the ever-classic “playing pretend.” Now, it may seem a little tiring to keep up with all the wild imaginings of a kid who […]

Kids Should be Able to Express Their Bodily Autonomy

When I was in high school, I volunteered as a summer camp counselor. It was a wonderful experience, and though I’d worked with kids in other contexts before that (including a heaping helping of babysitting), there was one thing in the experience that surprised me. One kid was particularly rambunctious in comparison to the others […]